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Thread: Who knows anything about linux?

  1. #1
    Another Honda Boy 98blackcivic's Avatar
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    Default Who knows anything about linux?

    I am doing my undergrad research and am required to learn new skills that i didnt think i would ever need or use.

    I am to run a linux emulator- i was told to go with cygwin which is a linux emulator plus xgterm

    I am trying to reinstall the emulator after a failed first try but what the hell is xgterm?!

    youtube and google have helped very little...

    can anyone explain this xgterm thing and give me any advice they can about running linux..

    also if you know that 'ubuntu' is better than what i am told to use, lemme know.

    thanks


  2. #2
    Slowest Car on IA David88vert's Avatar
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    There are tons that you can download for free. I helped a friend do that same project recently. Debain Mint was what he chose, and it was easy to get it running quickly. Download your image, burn your image, restart the computer and boot from the CD.

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    Why do you want to emulate linux with cygwin? ...
    why not just run a linux OS as a virtual machine with VMware player or like ^ said... burn the linux iso image to a disc and boot your PC with it... you dont have to install it , it will run as a trial.

  4. #4
    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    What are you going to be doing in the term? Shell scripting practice?

    I've never personally had good success with cygwin. I second nx2000det's suggestion of running a distro in a VM. Take a look at Oracle VirtualBox also, its a free virtual environment. You can boot the ISO as a live image as he suggested, or just install the distro. If youre going to use it was a live image within a VM then just connect the iso as a drive.

  5. #5
    ⎝⏠⏝⏠⎠ RandomGuy's Avatar
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    If you're only trying to get a linux terminal to mess around/learn with just do as the others posted above.

    Just download virtualbox, it's free: http://download.virtualbox.org/virtu...-82870-Win.exe
    With that ^ you can create little "virtual machines" that are imaginary computers inside of your real physical computer.
    Create a new virtual machine and install a linux distribution onto it

    If you were installing Ubuntu onto a real physical computer, you'd download this http://www.ubuntu.com/start-download...release=latest and burn it to a CD and then boot from that CD.

    In Virtual Box you just tell the fake CD drive in the fake computer that the .ISO file is the CD inside and go from there like you would on a real computer.

    Hope this helps

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by RandomGuy View Post
    If you're only trying to get a linux terminal to mess around/learn with just do as the others posted above.

    Just download virtualbox, it's free: http://download.virtualbox.org/virtu...-82870-Win.exe
    With that ^ you can create little "virtual machines" that are imaginary computers inside of your real physical computer.
    Create a new virtual machine and install a linux distribution onto it

    If you were installing Ubuntu onto a real physical computer, you'd download this http://www.ubuntu.com/start-download...release=latest and burn it to a CD and then boot from that CD.

    In Virtual Box you just tell the fake CD drive in the fake computer that the .ISO file is the CD inside and go from there like you would on a real computer.

    Hope this helps
    Exactly what all of these guys said. cygwin is sought out by people trying to run bash natively on their windows environments. Stick to a VM -- I recommend virtual box like mentioned above as it's light, free, and great for the desktop. Lot's of community and OS support as well. The second thing you should consider is what distribution you want to use and that is all based on what you're looking to do. Given that you're using it for training purposes I'd recommend Ubuntu/Fedora for Desktop (graphical desktop interface) and CentOS/Ubuntu for server (command line only). The reason is that they're pretty standard among the industry and most distributions are based off of them.

    Just remember... linux is linux... the only difference between them is packaging. CentOS and Ubuntu both have a gigantic community with lots of help. CentOS being stronger on the commercial side and Ubuntu being stronger on the hobbyist/enthusiasts. Both are equal in their ability, however, most find that Ubuntu is better for beginners.

    Lastly, if you're not working in command line, you're not really learning anything about linux so don't worry too much about the eye candy. Hope this helps.
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    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    DO as randomguy just posted. Installing any OS in a virtual environment is the best and sfaest way to do anything at all. if you hose it, then you just delete the VM and reinstall. It puts the OS in its own "sandbox" and completely isolates itself from your primary OS and will not affect it in any way.

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    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    Guiness, do you currently hold CCIE?

  9. #9
    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    Yes, currently I do and am going to retire from the industry in about 14 months. Cisco is a great company to work for if you get a chance to get on board. 10 years with the company and retiring after that fully vested and optioned out!!! Can't beat it!! Why do you ask might I ask?

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    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    Just curious, I've debated how high I want to go with the Cisco certifications, and I truthfully haven't met a CCIE except for one that worked as a design engineer for one of our VARs.

  11. #11
    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    If you are really wanting to pursue your goals, ambitions, and career in the Cisco line of work, then I recommend for everyone to aim high and shoot for the stars. If you are looking to stay with Cisco technology only, then at least go for a CC....P of any kind, from design, to network, security, and so forth. Just keep in mind that all Cisco certifications require you to have at least obtained the previous level of knowledge before you can move up to the next.......EXCEPT for CCIE. This is why I went for it, and to be honest, really lucked out. The CCIE is the only certification that does not require you to have any previous Cisco certification of any kind to obtain or at the very least attempt the exams. I say exams because the cert is broken into 3 parts, at least when I took it to get certified. you have your written and then your physical that is broken into 2 parts; development and initiation, and then the "repair" as I call it. Look it up and read from those who either have done it themselves or have knowledge from some other means. Also keep in mind that it is also not cheap either....not at all!! Lastly, 95% of those who attempt it will try it 2 to 3 times before they barely pass or pass it in general. Only a few will pass it on their first attempt. Look into it and if I can offer any help or advice, please feel free to ask me, but after I retire, I am out of the game for good. It will be time for me to live and love my life, not that I already don't of course, lol, that has been put on hold for my career, but has also been worth it in the long run and pay off!!!

  12. #12
    ⎝⏠⏝⏠⎠ RandomGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guinness View Post
    If you are really wanting to pursue your goals, ambitions, and career in the Cisco line of work, then I recommend for everyone to aim high and shoot for the stars. If you are looking to stay with Cisco technology only, then at least go for a CC....P of any kind, from design, to network, security, and so forth. Just keep in mind that all Cisco certifications require you to have at least obtained the previous level of knowledge before you can move up to the next.......EXCEPT for CCIE. This is why I went for it, and to be honest, really lucked out. The CCIE is the only certification that does not require you to have any previous Cisco certification of any kind to obtain or at the very least attempt the exams. I say exams because the cert is broken into 3 parts, at least when I took it to get certified. you have your written and then your physical that is broken into 2 parts; development and initiation, and then the "repair" as I call it. Look it up and read from those who either have done it themselves or have knowledge from some other means. Also keep in mind that it is also not cheap either....not at all!! Lastly, 95% of those who attempt it will try it 2 to 3 times before they barely pass or pass it in general. Only a few will pass it on their first attempt. Look into it and if I can offer any help or advice, please feel free to ask me, but after I retire, I am out of the game for good. It will be time for me to live and love my life, not that I already don't of course, lol, that has been put on hold for my career, but has also been worth it in the long run and pay off!!!
    Seriously it's a baller cert.

    They're like networking navy seals.

  13. #13
    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    LOL. Never heard the correlation of those two in the same sentence, but still funny all the same!!

  14. #14
    ⎝⏠⏝⏠⎠ RandomGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guinness View Post
    LOL. Never heard the correlation of those two in the same sentence, but still funny all the same!!
    I say that because a friend once told me about the test before he took it (or some similar baller Cisco technology cert)
    Basically they fly a bunch of people in and they have to do like 8 hours of insane testing for a bunch of days in a row, and at the end most people who take it will fail. He mentioned other specifics that were pretty badass, but I don't remember lol- things along the lines of extreme conditions. EX: UNDERWATER BLINDFOLDED NMAP TEST

  15. #15
    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    ..
    Last edited by green91; 11-18-2013 at 09:42 PM.

  16. #16
    ⎝⏠⏝⏠⎠ RandomGuy's Avatar
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    ..
    Last edited by green91; 11-18-2013 at 09:43 PM. Reason: removing personal shit

  17. #17
    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    Im not expecting it to be bad

  18. #18
    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    According to Indeed, the average salary for a CCNA in Atlanta is $89K, so it really isn't to bad for a starting point in networking considering hte average starting pay for a network engineer in Atlanta is about $75-$80K and a senior network engineer is about $112K. The key is make your specialty, whatever it is, part of a small pool. The smaller the pool, the larger the payout for it. For instance, a doctor may make $110-$130K a year, but a specialist, neurologist, endocrinologist, etc, can make up to $300K as some anesthesiologist do.

  19. #19
    Mountain man green91's Avatar
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    Meant to follow up -- passed the CCNA recently. As long as you understand the topics it wasn't bad at all.

    Guinness - I am a network engineer

  20. #20
    CCIE guinness's Avatar
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    Congratulations man!! Next step is the CCNP or CCDP depending what direction you are wanting to take yourself. Network admin in a Windows environment or Linux-based?

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